November Fly of the month

CDC Emerger

Instructor: Nigel Wilkinson

Nigel’s CDC Emerger is designed to sit just within the surface film. Try this fly when you can see trout feeding just under the surface or in the foam line. It can be fished in lakes or streams, upstream or across and down.

  • Hook: 12 – 16 Thread: Black 8/0
  • Tail: golden pheasant tips or brown hen hackle.
  • Body: hare or rabbit dubbing tied (to make a slim body)
  • Rib: fine gold or copper wire
  • Wing 2-3 matching cdc feathers, any colour (may use more feathers here)

Method: Tie thread to curve of hook and tie on tail, (about ¾ length of shaft) Tie in fine wire for rib. Dub hare or rabbit fur on thread and wind to eye, then tie off. Now spiral the wire to the front and tie off, then trim. Take 2-3 matching cdc feathers and lay them on top of each other. Lay the feathers on the back of the fly so they are just a little shorter than the tail. Tie them on carefully and whip finish. This fly should have a slim body. It is similar to a hare and copper, with cdc feathers added. You may use a caddis hook but tied without a tail. Other options are to use different colours, or make a slim body with white thread, or use UV dubbing.

NOVEMBER-fly

June 2017

Fly Of the MonthMaking mono eyes for a damsel nymph.

Instructor: Joe Fleet

 To make eyes for your damsel nymph you need a short length of 10-20lb mono line. (1-2 cm depending on size of the fly you wish to tie.)

Hold the piece of line with your forceps in the centre. Now use the flame from a lighter to melt one end of the line, forming a ball. Burn the other end in the same way. You will be left with a short length of nylon with a ball shape on either end, like dumbbell eyes. You can colour the eyes if you wish using a waterproof marker pen.

Damsel nymph

Wind on the thread about twelve wraps, no more than a third of the hook shankfrom  behind the eye . Lay the mono eyes along the shaft of the hook .about four or five mm back from the hook eye. Tie on with 2-3 wraps using the pinch method then turn the eyes so they lay either side of the shaft. Tie in firmly with figure 8 winds of the thread.

Take a small piece of straight marabou not the more bodied type of marabou that is usually used when tying woolly buggers. Tie it in directly behind the mono eye. Just a few wraps to secure as this nymph needs to be sparse, almost transparent in fact.  The marabou should extend 1-2 hook lengths for the tail but do not trim the excess.

Now pull the excess marabou forward and tie it in front of the hook eye make a few wraps to give the impression of the damsel flies mandibles Return the tying thread behind the mono eyes and wrap once Then pull the marabou back between the eyes and tie it again behind the eyes. Always use the pinch method when securing your materials to any hook

Now cut the excess marabou leaving a short stub to form the wing case.

April 2017

Tying Larry’s Passion Vine Hopper

The Passion Vine Hopper is essentially a triangle in silhouette so is very easy to tie in multiple styles.

My version is simply a body of thread or foam and a printed wing pattern.

 

 Hook size 14 or 16  dry fly.  Hook should be approximately 1cm long.

Thread body :   useing black or brown thread , start at the bend and create a tapered body making it very wide at the front.

Wings – cut a triangle wing from any of the various wing materials that are available.  The size is 1cm long x 1cm wide at the hook end.   Leave a long narrow neck in front so you can tie the wing down. I put a good ‘dollop’ of thread cement on the body before positioning the wing and tying in, the wing covers the whole hook. Tie off with a large head. I also use a ‘blob’  of UV  epoxy to make a fat head and colour it black with a  felt tip pen.

Foam body version.  this will not sink.

Start as above with the thread covering the hook and then cut a piece of thin brown foam (2-3mm thick) into a triangle 1cm long , very thin at the hook end and about 3-4mm wide  at the head .  Tie in from the hook end and make sure you finish clear of the eye of the hook.  Again I put head cement along the body and lay my wing down and tie off. Do not crush the foam head when tying off as the head of the PVH is very large in proportion to his body.  Again a blob of UV epoxy if you want too.

Very simple to tie but deadly when they are feeding on the surface  under willows.

 

 

 

March 2017

Fly Of the Month The Red Buzzer (Roy Coulson)

Special thanks to Roy Coulson for this month’s fly tying demonstration, the Red Buzzer. Roy started fishing in the UK, where he captained the Derbyshire Team.

He fished in the All England competition and finished 29th out of 700. 

Roy has been fly tying for over forty years and was also a tutor. He came from Taupo to demonstrate this fly, and prepared very good notes, including a pre-tied sample for all who came to the demonstration. Roy uses the red buzzer as a very effective fish catching pattern in lakes like Otamangakau and Aniwhenua. He usually fishes the Red Buzzer as the dropper, a damsel nymph on point and a dry fly as indicator. He says it is best fished static, or with a gentle lift and drop action….in many cases wave action will do the trick.

Hook:           Kamasan B110 Grubber, size 10 – 16

Thread:         Red Glo-brite Fluorescent floss (Shade No. 3)

RedBuzzerFly

Red Buzzer

Rib:           .007” copper wire

Wing Bud:    Mylar Holographic tinsel (red)

Wingcase:   Mylar tinsel (Pearl)

Method

  1. Tie on the red floss then double the floss over and tie it under the bed of floss from the eye to just around the bend of the hook. This leaves a loop which will eventually become the tail.
  2. Tie in the copper wire from the wing bud position (about 1/3 of the hook from the eye) to the tail, winding the red floss over it.
  3. Wind the red floss up to the wing bud position. Try to make 9-10 winds as this will indicate the correct number of segments.
  4. Wind copper wire to the wing bud position giving a segmented look, tie off and trim.
  5. Tie in the red Mylar wing buds keeping them evenly positioned each side of the fly.
  6. Tie in the pearl Mylar wing case on the top of the fly
  7. Build up the thorax area with tying thread.
  8. Pull both wing buds and the wing case to the tie-off point behind the eye and whip finish.
  9. Cut the loop in the tail to a realistic length.
  10. Apply resin and cure with a UV light.

                 Roy says this is a simple tie, but I found it quite tricky getting the Mylar tinsel in the correct place and tied down neatly……I obviously need more practise!

 

What’s Happening This Month

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Comming Up: Fly Fishing Course 23rd February 2017 (Read More)

What’s On This Month

March 2017

Mohaka  Club Trips -March and April

As last year’s trip was so successful and well attended we will be offering two trips to the Mohaka this year -March  24-25-26 and April 21-22-23 so no reason to miss a trip .

 Once again based at Mountain Valley Lodge on McVicars Road. We have the bunk houses booked again plus there are cabins, caravan sites and tent sites to cater for everyone. Please check their website for prices and facilities, if you are not planning on using the bunk houses you will need to book your own accommodation.

The Mohaka has water for everyone from beginners to Advanced Fly Fisherman so it caters to all levels of experience and there will be tuition for those new to River Fishing.

Please let me know ASAP if you plan on attending and accommodation requirements.

Convenor    Larry Ware  –     larry@artcity.co.nz   or 027 645 544

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