December Fly of the Month

Fly Of the MonthThe Adams Dry Fly

Instructor: Wayne Woodward

This fly is considered a general imitation of a an adult mayfly, flying caddis or midge. It was designed by Leonard Halliday from Mayfield, Michigan in 1922, at the request of his friend Charles Adams. The Adams has been considered one of the most popular, versatile, effective and best-selling dry flies since its creation.

Dry Fly Hook:           #10-20 (Black Magig F12 used tonight)

Wing:                         Grizzly hackle Wing Tips (opposed)

Body:                         Grey dubbing

Tail:                            Grizzly and Red Furnace hackle fibres combined

Hackle/s:                   Grizzly and Red Furnace Hackle to match hook size.

  1. Tie in the wings facing forward and wrap thread to hold wings upright. Use a figure 8 tie to separate wings. Make the wings equal in height to the length of the hook shank. Leave enough distance in front of the wings to fisish the fly.
  2. Wrap thread to tie in the tail fibres, ensuring they are equal to the hook length.
  3. Dub forward to create a carrot-shaped body stopping behind the wings leaving enough room to tie in the hackles.
  4. Tie in one grizzly hackle first, then two red furnace hackles, with dull sides facing you. Wind the red hackles 2-3 times behind the wings, then forward in front of the wings. Wrap a couple of turns in front of the wings and then tie off. Then wind the grizzly hackle forward in the same manner and tie off.
  5. Whip finish using the Matarellui whip finisher, or half hitch tool if you’ve been to Phil’s fly-tying class. Cement the thread head ensuring the eye of the hook is clear.

adams dry

November Fly of the month

CDC Emerger

Instructor: Nigel Wilkinson

Nigel’s CDC Emerger is designed to sit just within the surface film. Try this fly when you can see trout feeding just under the surface or in the foam line. It can be fished in lakes or streams, upstream or across and down.

  • Hook: 12 – 16 Thread: Black 8/0
  • Tail: golden pheasant tips or brown hen hackle.
  • Body: hare or rabbit dubbing tied (to make a slim body)
  • Rib: fine gold or copper wire
  • Wing 2-3 matching cdc feathers, any colour (may use more feathers here)

Method: Tie thread to curve of hook and tie on tail, (about ¾ length of shaft) Tie in fine wire for rib. Dub hare or rabbit fur on thread and wind to eye, then tie off. Now spiral the wire to the front and tie off, then trim. Take 2-3 matching cdc feathers and lay them on top of each other. Lay the feathers on the back of the fly so they are just a little shorter than the tail. Tie them on carefully and whip finish. This fly should have a slim body. It is similar to a hare and copper, with cdc feathers added. You may use a caddis hook but tied without a tail. Other options are to use different colours, or make a slim body with white thread, or use UV dubbing.

NOVEMBER-fly

April 2017

Tying Larry’s Passion Vine Hopper

The Passion Vine Hopper is essentially a triangle in silhouette so is very easy to tie in multiple styles.

My version is simply a body of thread or foam and a printed wing pattern.

 

 Hook size 14 or 16  dry fly.  Hook should be approximately 1cm long.

Thread body :   useing black or brown thread , start at the bend and create a tapered body making it very wide at the front.

Wings – cut a triangle wing from any of the various wing materials that are available.  The size is 1cm long x 1cm wide at the hook end.   Leave a long narrow neck in front so you can tie the wing down. I put a good ‘dollop’ of thread cement on the body before positioning the wing and tying in, the wing covers the whole hook. Tie off with a large head. I also use a ‘blob’  of UV  epoxy to make a fat head and colour it black with a  felt tip pen.

Foam body version.  this will not sink.

Start as above with the thread covering the hook and then cut a piece of thin brown foam (2-3mm thick) into a triangle 1cm long , very thin at the hook end and about 3-4mm wide  at the head .  Tie in from the hook end and make sure you finish clear of the eye of the hook.  Again I put head cement along the body and lay my wing down and tie off. Do not crush the foam head when tying off as the head of the PVH is very large in proportion to his body.  Again a blob of UV epoxy if you want too.

Very simple to tie but deadly when they are feeding on the surface  under willows.

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March 2017

Fly Of the Month The Red Buzzer (Roy Coulson)

Special thanks to Roy Coulson for this month’s fly tying demonstration, the Red Buzzer. Roy started fishing in the UK, where he captained the Derbyshire Team.

He fished in the All England competition and finished 29th out of 700. 

Roy has been fly tying for over forty years and was also a tutor. He came from Taupo to demonstrate this fly, and prepared very good notes, including a pre-tied sample for all who came to the demonstration. Roy uses the red buzzer as a very effective fish catching pattern in lakes like Otamangakau and Aniwhenua. He usually fishes the Red Buzzer as the dropper, a damsel nymph on point and a dry fly as indicator. He says it is best fished static, or with a gentle lift and drop action….in many cases wave action will do the trick.

Hook:           Kamasan B110 Grubber, size 10 – 16

Thread:         Red Glo-brite Fluorescent floss (Shade No. 3)

RedBuzzerFly

Red Buzzer

Rib:           .007” copper wire

Wing Bud:    Mylar Holographic tinsel (red)

Wingcase:   Mylar tinsel (Pearl)

Method

  1. Tie on the red floss then double the floss over and tie it under the bed of floss from the eye to just around the bend of the hook. This leaves a loop which will eventually become the tail.
  2. Tie in the copper wire from the wing bud position (about 1/3 of the hook from the eye) to the tail, winding the red floss over it.
  3. Wind the red floss up to the wing bud position. Try to make 9-10 winds as this will indicate the correct number of segments.
  4. Wind copper wire to the wing bud position giving a segmented look, tie off and trim.
  5. Tie in the red Mylar wing buds keeping them evenly positioned each side of the fly.
  6. Tie in the pearl Mylar wing case on the top of the fly
  7. Build up the thorax area with tying thread.
  8. Pull both wing buds and the wing case to the tie-off point behind the eye and whip finish.
  9. Cut the loop in the tail to a realistic length.
  10. Apply resin and cure with a UV light.

                 Roy says this is a simple tie, but I found it quite tricky getting the Mylar tinsel in the correct place and tied down neatly……I obviously need more practise!